SOLVED: Fragment Nine: Galifanx


#121

Going off of that could be a lot of things, Mantis Shrimp can see colours we can’t, pit vipers can detect heat signatures like infrared, and microscopes can see things the eye can’t see.


#122

Hey, as far as the Titans…I’m sure somebody has mentioned this before, but I wonder if it’s talking the race of Titans?

Could also be something to do with Saturn, given its moon is Titan.


#123

Maybe it’s an old word for telescope. How about perspicillum?


#124

And Saturn was a Titan in Roman Myth. Although I may be off on that.


#125

Monoceros would make sense for “sees what we cannot”, it’s supposedly a constellation that’s hard to see with the naked eye. But not sure how a unicorn fits into giant, titan, dragon etc.


#126

Closest we’ve come is a Titan named Crius, the ruler of constellations.


#127

Don’t mean to break the train of thought, but the Prime Meridian’s disc has been updated, complete with the sign for Jupiter!


#128

Maybe, like someone said, it’s a specific telescope like the good ole Hubble?


#129

Right, except everything seems to be an old word.


#130

The one at the observatory itself is the Great Equatorial Telescope

This one was mentioned before and seemingly unconfirmed, but mentioning again just in case.


#131

Well, we’ve got two of the traits, then - Saturn being a Titan and a (gas) giant. Not sure about the other 3 though. :sweat:


#132

Telescopium is the modern latin translation of telescope


#133

The largest on earth is the Great Magellan.


#134

Sirius A is the brightest star in the sky.

Lies between Orion and Draco.

That’s 3 out of 4. Sorta.

It’s a part of Canis Major or Canis Majoris.


#135

Maybe it’s the name of a great astronomer? Such as Galileo?


#136

Well, Crius was a Titan, Draco a dragon, and Orion was known as “the giant.” From what I can tell, they all can’t be seen at the same time.

EDIT: Cruis’ constellation is Aries. So Aries, Draco, and Orion.

EDIT 2: So I pulled out my star guid app and Aries, Draco, and Orion are pretty much in a straight line across the sky. Don’t know how this helps us though.


#137

@Chordie I’m on my phone and can’t really keep up right now. The top lost should be a wiki anyone can edit though. I won’t be able to do much til morning. Sorry.


#138

Dude, no worries :smiley:


#139

Sirius A is the brightest star in the sky.


#140

All great light combined could be about lens refraction, an achromatic lens in a telescope focusing the light onto the mirror like a laser. I’m just throwing stuff at the wall to see what sticks at this point.